Viewing entries in
Opportunities

Word Counts: Make your Words Count

Comment

Word Counts: Make your Words Count

Capture planning, designing the solution, story-boarding answers… Here at HealthBid, we recognise these as the key parts of the process that is bidding. However, when composing the bid itself, the basic rules of writing come back into play: structure, content, & word counts. Structure and content are on the whole prepared for through the previous stages, yet word counts are set by the commissioning body and have to be adhered to. Unless, of course, there is no word count... Either way, capped or uncapped, it is a useful part of the question to take into account.

 

Capped

When there is a word count, this is a good indication of how much content you should include. For example, 500 words indicates only the bare bones of your ideas should be cohesively included, whereas 4000 words really gives you room for examples, thorough explanations and justifications.

Despite what can feel like frustrating restrictions at the time, word counts can improve your answer. They prevent you from waffling, forcing you to be concise and really reflect on what you are writing. They are therefore not just there to consume yet more time through cutting words at the end of the project.

However, the amount of content you have for each question will differ. There is little point padding out an answer just to reach the word count when you could have said the same information in half the number of words. This will retract from the key points within the response and just serve to dilute your answer. It is important to be confident with your writing; if you believe you have covered all the important points and communicated them well, yet are under the word limit, leave it be.

With a capped word count, also make sure to thoroughly read the tender documentation. Where you include diagrams, appendices, etc., be aware that, in some cases, these may count towards the word count.

 

Uncapped

Bid responses can also have no word count. This may initially seem like the ideal situation, with the possibility to write whatever you want without any consideration for its length. It certainly is a lot easier when you first put pen to paper, as there is less pressure to adhere to a limit. However, as mentioned above, word counts can help your answer. The danger is that, with an unlimited amount of words, the key points are hidden within a large amount of other information which, if we’re honest, isn’t entirely relevant and consequently doesn’t need to be there.

In this situation, it is often helpful to set your own limit. Having read the question and knowing your content, the information required is usually clear, thus the necessary length of the response reflects this. It also makes sense if there are multiple bid writers working on the same submission, as it avoids large discrepancies between the lengths of answers, making the bid more cohesive when read as a whole.

 

If you need support with any part of the bidding process, from simply cutting down your answers to fit the word count to writing it your responses for you, get in touch with our Managing Director, Tom Sheppard, at tom.sheppard@healthbid.co.uk.

Comment

Refine your design

Comment

Refine your design

As you may presume, the main focus of bid writing is, indeed, writing. Yet it is important in the early stages of your planning process to fully think through what you’re offering, i.e. what you will be writing about. The service specification will provide the basis for what you’re writing, but the way that your organisation interprets it and provides its solution is another way to secure a win.

 

The solution design really comes from that early planning stage we always speak of – you can gather information about the commissioning team, the incumbent, the approaches of competitors, and any other relevant information. Bidding events are another great way to gauge the situation, often giving you a chance not only to clarify the spec but to get a feel for what the commissioners want.

 

So, with all that in mind, solution design should reflect what you’re capable of, what your organisation believes in, and what is being asked for. Ensuring you come up with a solution at a reasonable price (not always the cheapest, just so long as it represents good value for money), which offers something that not only responds to the service spec but also has room for progress and innovation, gives you the all-round package. Once you have your solution design, the writing can begin to take its final shape.

 

Here at HealthBid, we don’t just write bids. We also use our expertise and strategic viewpoint to support the creation of your solution design. If you want help with creating your plan, or maybe just a bit of support with putting it on paper for the final bid, we can offer our blended approach of writing, reviewing and expert strategic advice, or whichever combination suits you best. Give our team a call on 07341 338 200 if you want to find out more.

Comment

Manage to win

Comment

Manage to win

To be successful when bidding, there’s a simple way to approach it: to manage to win, manage the process. There are obviously other factors which contribute to the success, such as sector knowledge, meticulous scoping and effective writing. Yet without thorough management, your bid risks lacking focus and losing direction, ultimately meaning it won’t be at its best on submission day. Which is obviously too late.

 

We have said this many a time here at HealthBid (& we will continue to do so!): preparation is key to unlocking the door to success. It’s never too early to start on a tender, especially ones which run over a relatively extensive period of time. With the best will in the world, someone can’t keep when every document and every answer is due, as well as who needs to do what, all in their head. And, quite frankly, what’s the point? It won’t help others to see the progress of the team, and it’s so much easier to write it down.

 

If you do this, you’re already on the right track. However, your own notes and squiggles can often be difficult to interpret by someone else, which is usually fine if they’re just for you. With a bid, it’s the teamwork which can make or break the process. For this reason, you need a communal document which everyone can access, consult and update; you then know what’s happening and when, and whether it has been achieved – perfect for keeping an eye on progress, and managing the outcomes.

 

With the emphasis on teamwork, HealthBid are not just your average bid consultancy. We can of course follow the usual approach, providing you with one of our associates, but we can also offer our a more multi-skilled approach with our in-house bid engine. It keeps it simple and effective: with only one day rate to pay as standard, you get the best combination of bid writing, bid management, and specialist insight of a whole team, with all the varying skills in there. To revolutionise the way you bid or simply just to find out more about our blended approach, contact our Business Development Manager, Joe, at joe.gatenby@healthbid.co.uk

Comment

Comment

Finding the right tender for you

Searching for tenders can be frustrating, and it can often seem that there is not something out there that fits your product or service. 

The first step to solving this is to make sure that you are searching in the right place. Before you spend money with an expensive service that finds tenders for you, make sure you have spent some time familiarising yourself with Contracts Finder, the Government's website that aggregates opportunities. It is much improved, and the search function is pretty granular to find relevant things. 

The second step is to go back to basics on your core strengths. Instead of thinking of yourselves as creating a specific product or service, think about the problems that it solves. Link this to your research into the health sectors pressure points. For example, your transport company isn't just a provider of patient transport, it is a way of improving flow around the hospital system.

If you think about opportunities in these terms, it makes it much easier to find things to solve.

The other thing that we always advise our customers is to look for subcontracting opportunities. The NHS has a tendency to put out very big tenders, then let potential bidders work out who they would need to partner with to make them happen. Look to see who has won work in your area, and see if there are opportunities to subcontract. This can save a lot of time, and open up a much broader set of opportunities.

As always, if you want some advice and support with finding the best opportunities for your business, then drop us a line, and we can have a chat.

Comment

Comment

Bidding Opportunity

Today's opportunity is this 111 tender, based in Northamptonshire. The bidder event has just gone past, but it's not too late to get involved. 111 is an area full of possibility for innovative solutions, and this looks like a good sized opportunity. For help with solution design or bidding, get in touch - and we can arrange a conversation.

Comment